Over the past few years it has seemed like LinkedIn were positioning themselves to take over your professional address book. Through offering CRM-like features, users were able to see a summary of their recent communications with each connection as well as being able to add their own notes and categorise their connections with tags. It appeared to be a reasonable strategy for the company, and many users took the opportunity to store valuable business information straight onto their connections.

Then at the start of 2017 LinkedIn decided to progressively foist a new user experience upon its users, and features like these disappeared overnight in lieu of a more ‘modern’ interface. People who grew to depend on this integration were in for a rude shock — all of a sudden it was missing. Did LinkedIn delete the information? There was no prior warning given and I still haven’t seen any acknowledgement or explanation (leave alone an apology) from LinkedIn/Microsoft on the inconvenience/damage caused.

If anything, this reveals the risks in entrusting your career/business to a proprietary cloud service. Particularly with free/freemium (as in cost) services, the vendor is more likely to change things on a whim or move that functionality to a paid tier.

It’s another reason why I’ve long been an advocate for open standards and free and open source software.

Fortunately there’s a way to export all of your data from LinkedIn. This is what we’ll use to get back your tags and notes. These instructions are relevant for the new interface. Go to your account settings and in the first section (“Basics”) you should see an option called “Getting an archive of your data”.

LinkedIn: Getting an archive of your data

Click on Request Archive and you’ll receive an e-mail when it’s available for download. Extract the resulting zip file and look for a file called Contacts.csv. You can open it in a text editor, or better yet a spreadsheet like LibreOffice Calc or Excel.

In my copy, my notes and tags were in columns D and E respectively. If you have many, it may be a lot of work to manually integrate them back into your address book. I’d love suggestions on how to automate this. Since I use Gmail, I’m currently looking into Google’s address book import/export format, which is CSV based.

As long as Microsoft/LinkedIn provide a full export feature, this is a good way to maintain ownership of your data. It’s good practice to take an export every now and then to give yourself some peace-of-mind and avoid vendor lock-in.

This article has also been published on LinkedIn.

New LinkedIn Interface Delete Your Data? Here’s How to Bring it Back. / 'Til All Are One by Sridhar Dhanapalan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike CC BY-SA 4.0 licence.
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